Yarn Along–Raindrop Cardigan Week 1

I had started a new washcloth set for the Etsy store, but shelved it for the nonce since I really really need summer tops. The more I look around, the more I’m convinced I’m just going to have to knit my own. Or wait for places to go on clearance. The frugal side of me balks at paying $50 for a shirt, you know? Ah, my poor Etsy store, one day I will fill you.

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But in the meantime, I cast on the Raindrop Cardigan by Jennifer Wood. I really like her patterns; I think I have eight in my Ravelry queue. I chose to use some recycled cotton yarn from my stash. Curious… it says it’s worsted, and I got gauge at the right needles, but it seems so loose. Not that a loose knit cardigan will feel horrid in August down here, when we’re roasting in the humidity…. so we’ll see how it ends up.

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My reading this week may be seen above. Pearls, Girls, and Monty Bodkin arrived fresh off the presses. I think I borrowed it from the library a few years ago as I remembered the plot. However, still fun. The arrival of this volume means I officially need to create another Wodehouse shelf in our home library! This is #53 in the collection if I’m correct. As Wodehouse wrote something on the order of 98 novels, I’m over halfway there!

The other read? Joy in the Ordinary…just an ordinary wholesome story written by no one in particular. Ahem. 😉 Seriously, this is less about navel gazing and more about getting back into the characters before I recommence summer writing on the sequel. I’ve missed writing. It’s time to start a little again.

 

 

Still around!

Hello! No, we haven’t fallen off the face of the earth. I’m saving a big post for {p,f,h,r} tomorrow because I did finally take pictures again!

The children, except Trooper, have been sleeping past seven in the mornings so I’ve been able to get a goodish bit of writing done on the sequel. I completed Chapter 7 this very morning. As I wrote I could hear the heat come on and over time it began to register to me that the heat had indeed been on quite a while more than usual. At first I didn’t think much of it, as it is for once feeling like a proper October outside so our heat has been running. But this was unusual for the heat to be on so long. When I finished I got up and went to the thermostat and saw that Trooper, who likes the heat and likes to hear the sound of the air coming through the vents, had moved the temperature from 70 to 84. It was now 78 in the house and feeling quite toasty. No wonder the rest of the children were still asleep! I dropped the temp to the daytime number of 67 and set the lock on the thermostat.

Sorry, big guy, but 84 is a little extreme. 😉

Cedar Street

As we traveled up to visit my parents for the Independence Day holiday,we cut through a small country town and had to stop at a red light. Looking up at the street sign, I laughed, “oh look, dear, it’s Cedar Street!” In Joy and her sequel, the main characters live on Cedar St. However, this particular street looked as if it had its height in 1961 and never regained it. It was also across from a penitentiary.

“Not exactly how I pictured it,” I mused.

There was a commercial building at the corner. “Is that Maloneys?” my husband teased. “It looks like a bail bond place.”

It was, in fact, a nondescript generic bar offering long necks for 1.99. “I think Dominic could do better than that,” I joked.

Still I wondered whether there was a Cedar Street like I’d imagined, and while out driving one day, I found it. It was in Indiana after all, in a historic district so all the commercial buildings were still preserved in 19th century glory (huzzah! I didn’t see anything that could be Maloneys, but plenty of buildings that could have been the microbrewery). Driving up Cedar, it was as if my imagination had come to life in front of me. All the houses were between the 1880s – 1920s and all well maintained. I could almost picture Peggy Maloney tending a flower garden in front of one house. Were I not leery of stopping to take pictures of homes, I might have done so, but I was also navigating a 12-passenger van in a narrow street with cars parked on either side. Of course, this town wasn’t exactly bordered by corn and soybean fields (perhaps 30 years ago) and it wasn’t at all what I had pictured when I thought of Tudor. But I still drove off with a smile on my face.

Why did this mean so much to me? I guess it was an affirmation that I kept the descriptions real. To an author, it’s immensely satisfying.

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Checking In

Still here, my friends! Chapter 5 is not done yet, mainly as things picked up a bit after our epidemic last week. I’m still plugging away, though. A good eight hours’ straight sleep, and then about oh, four or five free hours to just write would do the trick. Not that the writing hours have to be consecutive, mind you, but it would be nice if the sleep would be.

Riiight, as if that’s happened much since college. We didn’t know we had it so good back then. 😉

 

{pretty, happy, happy, real}

Pretty

Found in the front yard after a thunderstorm.

Happy

We finally got our first batch of strawberries from the farm market stand!  I did not have any lack of helpers–or should I say snackers?

Happy x 2

When my parents came down they brought this little wooden kitchen set that Mom found at a garage sale for $3 (!!!).  It has been the Toy of the Week and it’s so nice to have a proper spot for all our Melissa & Doug foodstuffs.

Real

My new dryer arrives today.  I am so happy.  I appreciate the nostalgia of hanging clothes on the line as much as anyone, but nevertheless a working dryer will be most welcome!  At the risk of airing a First World complaint, my old dryer broke over a month ago.

Meanwhile….
Hello and welcome to those who are stopping by from Elizabeth’s review on In the Heart of my Home.  It has been such fun “meeting” so many new people and catching up on those I already knew. 🙂  And thanks to all who helped put Joy in the Ordinary on the top 25 Religious Fiction purchases in both Fiction and Romance categories on Kindle yesterday.  I’m humbly grateful.